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Pre-Camp Reads: Looking at OL Mitch Morse

Posted Jun 29, 2016

Over the next few weeks, we will be taking a closer look at players on the Chiefs roster

It’s never an easy thing for an offensive lineman to step in and play as a rookie, let alone at the center position, but that’s exactly what former University of Missouri offensive lineman Mitch Morse did last year for the Chiefs.

What made the transition even more impressive is that Morse wasn’t just transitioning to the NFL. He was transitioning to a position he hadn’t played since his sophomore year in college.

Morse thrived in his role at center, being named to the Pro Football Writers of America’s All-Rookie team after starting 15 games and leading all Chiefs offensive linemen with 920 snaps played.

In fact, only quarterback Alex Smith (989) and tight end Travis Kelce (924) played more for the Chiefs offense last year than Morse.

Heading into his second season, Morse has already impressed Smith through offseason workouts.

“There is a lot on your plate, especially as a rookie,” Smith said of Morse and the center position, “so going into the second year, you have to know every single protection, run, player, and all that stuff, plus every single front you can get. 

“You have to be able to think on the fly up there, be fast, make good decisions, communicate clear – those are the things in your second year I see from [Morse]. He’s up there, he makes a decision, he’s loud, he’s clear.”

SEASON REVIEW

Morse’s athleticism may have been one of his most impressive on-the-field traits last season, fitting in perfectly with Andy Reid’s offense, which lends itself well to offensive linemen who can get out and run in space.

Morse helped running backs Charcandrick West and Spencer Ware rush for more than 1,000 yards with 10 touchdowns in 10 games after the season-ending injury to the franchise’s all-time leading rusher, Jamaal Charles, in Week 5.

He started 15 games in the regular season but missed the two playoff games as he dealt with a concussion.

HOW HE FITS

Morse returns to an offensive line that saw nine different starting combinations last year:

Current Look at the Chiefs Offensive Linemen

Name

Pos.

Ht.

Wt.

Age

Exp.

College

Devey, Jordan

OL

6-6

320

28

2

Memphis

Duvernay-Tardif, Laurent

OL

6-5

321

25

3

McGill (Canada)

Ehinger, Parker

OL

6-6

310

 

R

Cincinnati

Feigt, Curtis

OL

6-7

314

26

0

West Virginia

Fisher, Eric

OL

6-7

315

25

4

Central Michigan

Fragel, Reid

OL

6-8

308

25

1

Ohio State

Fulton, Zach

OL

6-5

316

24

3

Tennessee

Mayweather, Garrick

OL

6-2

319

 

R

Fordham

Morse, Mitch

OL

6-6

305

24

2

Missouri

Munyer, Daniel

OL

6-1

305

24

1

Colorado

Nowak, Drew

OL

6-3

292

26

3

Western Michigan

Pughsley, Jarrod

OL

6-4

310

25

1

Akron

Reid, Jah

OL

6-7

325

27

6

Central Florida

Schwartz, Mitchell

OL

6-5

320

27

5

California

Sterup, Zach

OL

6-9

318

 

R

Nebraska

2016 OUTLOOK

While much of the focus is always on who is throwing, catching or running the football, the truth is everything starts up front. Football games are won and lost in the trenches, and Morse and company look to build some continuity and improve an offense that managed to put up 25.3 points per game last year, which ranked No. 9 in the NFL.

“It’s our job to come and compete and get farther than last year,” Morse said. “Last year was great, but that’s behind us. We’re focused on winning a championship.”

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