Coach Bio

Al Harris
Secondary/Cornerbacks

Biography

Al Harris returns for his fifth season with the Chiefs and his second as secondary/cornerbacks coach in 2017 after spending his first three seasons as defensive assistant/secondary coach. Harris started his coaching career after a 15-year NFL playing career that saw him reach two Pro Bowls and earn an All-Pro selection.

Most recently in 2016, under Harris’ direction, veteran S Eric Berry (5th selection) and second-year CB Marcus Peters (2nd selection) were named to the 2017 Pro Bowl. Peters led the team and ranked tied-second in the league in interceptions (six) while Berry finished second on the roster in tackles (77) and added four interceptions with two touchdowns. Both Peters and Berry were additionally named to the Associated Press' All-Pro Team, while Berry earned the club's Derrick Thomas Award as the team's MVP. 

In Harris’ third season with the Chiefs in 2015, the defense proved to be one of the best in the league. The club forced 29 opponent turnovers on defense and special teams. The Chiefs defense ranked second in the league with 22 interceptions with four returned for a touchdown. Under Harris' guidance, DB Ron Parker recorded 5.0 sacks giving him 7.0 sacks in his career, which ranks first in Chiefs history among defensive backs. Additionally, Peters set the franchise record for passes defensed in a single season with 26, en route to being named the NFL's Defensive Rookie of the Year, as well as the club's Mack Lee Hill Award Winner, an award voted on by teamates for the top rookie or first year player. Following the 2015 season, Berry was named the NFL’s Comeback Player of the Year as well as being the recipient of the Ed Block Courage Award after overcoming Hodgkin’s lymphoma and making one of the greatest comebacks in NFL history.

Prior to joining the Chiefs in 2012, Harris served as a coaching intern with the Miami Dolphins under Head Coach Joe Philbin.

Originally drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the sixth round (169th overall) of the 1997 NFL Draft, Harris went on to play in 194 games (128 starts) in a 15-

year NFL playing career. He recorded 469 tackles (423 solo), 4.0 sacks (-22.0 yards), 21 interceptions returned for 407 yards with three returned for touchdowns, 148 passes defensed, two forced fumbles and two fumble recoveries. He appeared in 12 postseason games with four playoff starts, recording 31 tackles (29 solo), one interception returned for a 52-yard touchdown, 11 passes defensed and one forced fumble.

After spending his entire rookie campaign (1997) on Tampa Bay’s practice squad, he was waived and claimed by the Philadelphia Eagles for the 1998 season. He was a spot contributor in the defensive backfield appearing as the club’s nickel cornerback for five seasons (1998-2002). Starting with the 1999 season, he played for Chiefs Head Coach Andy Reid, who held the same position with the Eagles.

With the Eagles, Harris was a part of two NFC East division championship teams in 2001-02 as the team went on to compete in back-to-back NFC Championship games.

Following the 2002 season with Philadelphia, Harris was acquired by the Green Bay Packers. He spent seven seasons with the Packers (2003-09).

With the Packers, Harris started all 102 regular season games in seven seasons with the team, including playing in five postseason games (four starts). He earned trips to the Pro Bowl following the 2007-08 seasons.

He finished his career playing three games with the Miami Dolphins in 2010 and appearing in nine games (five starts) with the St. Louis Rams in 2011.

Harris spent two seasons (1993-94) at Trinity Valley Community College in Athens, Texas, where he was a member of the 1994 national championship team. He transferred to Texas A&M University-Kingsville where he was a two-year starter and letterman (1995-96) and was a first-team All-Lone Star Conference pick as a senior.

Education: ­Texas A&M-Kingsville (B.A. 1997). Born: Pompano Beach, Fla. Family: Wife - Shyla; Children - Al Jr., Gavin and Gage.

Al Harris returns for his fifth season with the Chiefs and his second as secondary/cornerbacks coach in 2017 after spending his first three seasons as defensive assistant/secondary coach. Harris started his coaching career after a 15-year NFL playing career that saw him reach two Pro Bowls and earn an All-Pro selection.

Most recently in 2016, under Harris’ direction, veteran S Eric Berry (5th selection) and second-year CB Marcus Peters (2nd selection) were named to the 2017 Pro Bowl. Peters led the team and ranked tied-second in the league in interceptions (six) while Berry finished second on the roster in tackles (77) and added four interceptions with two touchdowns. Both Peters and Berry were additionally named to the Associated Press' All-Pro Team, while Berry earned the club's Derrick Thomas Award as the team's MVP. 

In Harris’ third season with the Chiefs in 2015, the defense proved to be one of the best in the league. The club forced 29 opponent turnovers on defense and special teams. The Chiefs defense ranked second in the league with 22 interceptions with four returned for a touchdown. Under Harris' guidance, DB Ron Parker recorded 5.0 sacks giving him 7.0 sacks in his career, which ranks first in Chiefs history among defensive backs. Additionally, Peters set the franchise record for passes defensed in a single season with 26, en route to being named the NFL's Defensive Rookie of the Year, as well as the club's Mack Lee Hill Award Winner, an award voted on by teamates for the top rookie or first year player. Following the 2015 season, Berry was named the NFL’s Comeback Player of the Year as well as being the recipient of the Ed Block Courage Award after overcoming Hodgkin’s lymphoma and making one of the greatest comebacks in NFL history.

Prior to joining the Chiefs in 2012, Harris served as a coaching intern with the Miami Dolphins under Head Coach Joe Philbin.

Originally drafted by the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in the sixth round (169th overall) of the 1997 NFL Draft, Harris went on to play in 194 games (128 starts) in a 15-

year NFL playing career. He recorded 469 tackles (423 solo), 4.0 sacks (-22.0 yards), 21 interceptions returned for 407 yards with three returned for touchdowns, 148 passes defensed, two forced fumbles and two fumble recoveries. He appeared in 12 postseason games with four playoff starts, recording 31 tackles (29 solo), one interception returned for a 52-yard touchdown, 11 passes defensed and one forced fumble.

After spending his entire rookie campaign (1997) on Tampa Bay’s practice squad, he was waived and claimed by the Philadelphia Eagles for the 1998 season. He was a spot contributor in the defensive backfield appearing as the club’s nickel cornerback for five seasons (1998-2002). Starting with the 1999 season, he played for Chiefs Head Coach Andy Reid, who held the same position with the Eagles.

With the Eagles, Harris was a part of two NFC East division championship teams in 2001-02 as the team went on to compete in back-to-back NFC Championship games.

Following the 2002 season with Philadelphia, Harris was acquired by the Green Bay Packers. He spent seven seasons with the Packers (2003-09).

With the Packers, Harris started all 102 regular season games in seven seasons with the team, including playing in five postseason games (four starts). He earned trips to the Pro Bowl following the 2007-08 seasons.

He finished his career playing three games with the Miami Dolphins in 2010 and appearing in nine games (five starts) with the St. Louis Rams in 2011.

Harris spent two seasons (1993-94) at Trinity Valley Community College in Athens, Texas, where he was a member of the 1994 national championship team. He transferred to Texas A&M University-Kingsville where he was a two-year starter and letterman (1995-96) and was a first-team All-Lone Star Conference pick as a senior.

Education: ­Texas A&M-Kingsville (B.A. 1997). Born: Pompano Beach, Fla. Family: Wife - Shyla; Children - Al Jr., Gavin and Gage.